The monsters of beowulf

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The monsters of beowulf

We don't hear much in the way of a physical description, and this is because it's what Grendel represents that is the horror for the original audience.

His name is associated etymologically with "ground" or "bottom," but more importantly, consider the following: He is a "lone-walker" -- not part of a comitatus.

He kills -- well, that's fine -- but at night? He uses no weapon in battle -- while all other warriors practically have names for theirs. He has no father -- while everyone else introduces himself as "son of" someone.

The monsters of beowulf

The poet says, rather oddly, that he won't settle the feud -- so he doesn't offer or accept wergild, or he can't approach the gift-seat. The poet says, rather oddly, that he can't boast -- everyone else is expected to. He is described repeatedly in terms of deprivation and negatives.

These two are two sides of the same coin, and the coin is "warrior. We hear some material after the battle with Grendel that introduces the female perspective in roundabout ways, including Hrothgar's insistence that if Beowulf has a living mother, imagine how proud she'd be.

We also hear, in a tangential story the Finnsburg laiabout a grieving woman whose offspring have been murdered. So Grendel's mother's perspective is alluded to very obliquely. She snatches not skads of drunken warriors, but Hrothgar's favorite; so however arbitary that seems to have been in terms of her attack, she is functioning essentially in a blood-feud.

Beowulf becomes the invader into her hall just as Grendel was in Heorot.

The monsters of beowulf

Women in Anglo-Saxon culture are "peace-weavers" because one can convince oneself that arranged marriages will prompt feuds to simmer down and "cup-bearers" because they fetch more booze for the men. Grendel's mother is the opposite of what that culture values in women.

We keep hearing a term of 50 years mentioned: Beowulf is now the king -- the "ring-giver" who ideally distributes booty captured in battle to his thanes in accordance with their deserts.

Good kings are ring-givers and bad kings again we hear tangentially of a couple are miserly. The dragon functions then as the opposite of a good king because it guards the trreasure but can do nothing with it. It represents malice, destruction, and greed -- the dark side of kingship. Both the dragon and Beowulf die in this final battle, and the last images are those of waste and desolation.

When Beowulf is defending his reputation from Unferth's accusations in front of Hrothgar and the rest, he mentions having to fend off "niceras" -- sea-monsters.

My Chaucerian and Medievalist college professor, Thomas J. Garbaty said in about these things:The Role of the Monsters in Beowulf. Alexander M.

Bruce. As a fan of the original Star Trek, I can remember having fun counting up how many times the show tapped into the “evil twin” motif. There was the episode where Kirk’s psyche was split into two people, so that a nice but wishy-washy Kirk and a mean but decisive Kirk roamed the.

Beowulf, the renowned warrior of Geatland, must face three monsters, each stronger and more terrifying than the last. This lesson will focus on his battles with these fearsome creatures, from the. New York Times bestseller and winner of the Whitbread Award.

Composed toward the end of the first millennium, Beowulf is the elegiac narrative of the adventures of Beowulf, a Scandinavian hero who saves the Danes from the seemingly invincible monster Grendel and, later, from Grendel's mother.

J.R.R. Tolkien’s article, The Monsters and the Critics, represents a sort of call to order, a call for a condensed conviction about the Old English poem Beowulf, or, as Tolkien sometimes refers to it, The Beowulf.

The Role of the Monsters in Beowulf. Alexander M. Bruce. As a fan of the original Star Trek, I can remember having fun counting up how many times the show tapped into the “evil twin” motif. There was the episode where Kirk’s psyche was split into two people, so that a nice but wishy-washy Kirk and a mean but decisive Kirk roamed the.

Grendel is a character in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf (AD –). He is one of the poem's three antagonists (along with Grendel's mother and the dragon), all aligned in opposition against the protagonist Beowulf.

Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics - Wikipedia