House of leaves

How to say enough without saying too much? Some call it a love story.

House of leaves

House of leaves

Share House of Leaves is a psychological novel by Mark Z. Danielewski that has been described under multiple genre. The most interesting aspect in relation to the Slender Man mythos is the Navidson House.

The Navidson Record Edit The Navidson Record details a film self-shot documentary from Will Navidson, in which he and his family move to a house filled with spacial deformities.

Thoughts on everything I read for no one in particular

Will measures the house and notices that the inner wall of the house is a few inches larger than the outer wall- essentially meaning the house is larger on the inside than the outside, an impossibility.

After leaving the home for a trip, House of leaves returning, the Navidson family discovers a door has appeared in their living room wall that had not been there when they left. Opening the door leads them to a pitch dark hallway with ashen grey walls that are made of an unknown material.

This hall branches off to more halls, and more halls, and even more halls, creating an endless maze of halls, within this door, within a single house. Exploration into the halls reveals that the halls and walls are constantly changing, shifting, moving, extending and shortening, creating a new maze constantly.

The anomaly creates strange physical effects, and creates problems with certain technologies and compasses. The book uses symbolism to loosely associate the house to the Greek legend of Theseus and the Minotaur.

Style Edit The typography is unique in that the book uses a form of word distortion as an added effect in addition to its narrative. Words and phrases are set askew, they are moved about a page, reflected on opposite sides of pages. They are also written up, down, and diagonally.

The book is riddled in code. For example the term "House" is always in light blue. There are also check marks, removed sections, blanked-out sections, obscure references and phrases which litter the pages.

All of these are cited and noted by the publishers some of whom do not exist.

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The author himself does not claim the novel to be horror or of any genre, and even admitted that a fan had once called it a romance novel, to which he agreed. As a result, it is most likely to be interpreted by the individual as to the meanings in the text rather than any grand scheme of word play.

There they find themselves in a tunnel leading to an abandoned basement that they had previously been shown at in both the videos "78of It should also be noted that the group is dressed in the exact same clothes in which they appear in "77of A similar event takes place in later episodes, there is a dipiction of Vincent hopping from one house to the next by a series of interconnected doorways that lead to places they should not.

He ends up in new rooms or rooms that belong to other houses. Slenderman and The Rake seem to inhabit this dimension according to his father, and it is suggested that a location known as "Eden" lies at the center of the maze of halls, or that the halls may not exist at all.

The existence of these spacial inconsistancies may be an allusion to House of Leaves, specifically the Navidson Record.If so, House of Leaves might be right up your alley. The simple synopsis (and the only one you're going to get from me) is this is the story of Will, Karen, and their dream home, told through various narrators/5(K).

House of Leaves; If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.

You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. House of Leaves is both vast and claustrophobic, crammed with minutiae (footnotes, appendices, poems and letters, and layout trickery) yet cored by a deep, absorbing emptiness, a deliberate void that accommodates, even incorporates, each character's—perhaps even each /5().

House of Leaves is both vast and claustrophobic, crammed with minutiae (footnotes, appendices, poems and letters, and layout trickery) yet cored by a deep, absorbing emptiness, a deliberate void that accommodates, even incorporates, each character's—perhaps even each reader's—expectations, quirks, and fears/5().

House of Leaves [Mark Z. Danielewski] on ashio-midori.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Years ago, when House of Leaves was first being passed around, it was nothing more than a badly bundled heap of paper/5(K).

House of Leaves was recommended to me by a friend and I have to say, this book is incredible. If you like suspense, horror, and having nightmares about books (I'm serious), then this one is for you/5.

House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski